Steroid abuse in major league baseball

Abuse of anabolic steroids, however, can result in significant harm to the body. In humans, abuse can lead to coronary heart disease , sexual and reproductive disorders, immunodeficiencies , liver damage, stunted growth, aggressive behaviour , susceptibility to connective tissue injury, and (in females) irreversible masculinization. Similar side effects can occur in livestock and other animals. In horses , for example, anabolic steroids can cause liver damage and weakening of the tendons and can result in decreased testis size and sperm production in stallions and altered reproductive cycling in mares. Anabolic steroids are readily detected in urine and blood .

Laws and Penalties:  Concerns over growing illegal AAS abuse by teenagers, and many of the just discussed long-term effects, led Congress in 1991 to place the whole AAS class of drugs into Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).  Under this legislation, AAS are defined as any drug or hormonal substance, chemically and pharmacologically related to T (other than estrogens, progestins, and corticosteroids) that promotes muscle growth.  The possession or sale of AAS without a valid prescription is illegal.  Since 1991, simple possession of illegally obtained AAS carry a maximum penalty of one year in prison and a minimum $1,000 fine if this is an individual’s first drug offense.  The maximum penalty for trafficking (selling or possessing enough to be suspected of selling) is five years in prison and a fine of $250,000 if this is the individual’s first felony drug offense.  If this is the second felony drug offense, the maximum period of imprisonment and the maximum fine both double.  While the above listed penalties are for federal offenses, individual states have also implemented fines and penalties for illegal use of AAS.  State executive offices have also recognized the seriousness of AAS abuse and other drugs of abuse in schools. For example, the State of Virginia enacted a law that will allow student drug testing as a legitimate school drug prevention program (48, 49).

Awareness and educational efforts are working to help prevent anabolic steroid abuse in schools and communities. The Adolescents Training and Learning to Avoid Steroids (ATLAS) and the Athletes Targeting Healthy Exercise and Nutrition Alternatives (ATHENA) programs, funded by the NIDA, and supported by the Oregon Health & Science University programs is teaching athletes that they do not need steroids to build powerful muscles and improve athletic performance. These programs provide weight-training and nutrition alternatives, increase healthy behaviors, less likelihood to try steroids, and less likelihood to engage in other dangerous behaviors such as drinking and driving, use of marijuana and alcohol , and and improved body image. Bother Congress and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration endorsed these model prevention programs. 4

Common (1% to 10%): Sinusitis, nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection , bronchitis
Uncommon (% to 1%): Cough, dyspnea, snoring, dysphonia
Rare (less than %): Pulmonary microembolism (POME) (cough, dyspnea, malaise, hyperhidrosis, chest pain, dizziness, paresthesia, or syncope) caused by oily solutions
Frequency not reported: Sleep apnea
Postmarketing reports: Chest pain, asthma , chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , hyperventilation, obstructive airway disorder, pharyngeal edema, pharyngolaryngeal pain, pulmonary embolism , respiratory distress, rhinitis , sleep apnea syndrome [ Ref ]

Each user experiences their own unique feelings when using steroids and coming off the drug. When someone chooses to stop using they can experience a variety of withdrawal symptoms linked to addiction. Symptoms can include mood swings, fatigue, restlessness, loss of appetite, insomnia, reduced sex drive, the desire to take more steroids, and depression. Evidence for steroid addiction is certainly not as strong as it is for other drugs like cocaine or heroin. Though it is clear that people develop a tolerance and dependence on them and willingly experience negative consequences when using steroids - both of which are signs for drug dependence.

Steroid abuse in major league baseball

steroid abuse in major league baseball

Common (1% to 10%): Sinusitis, nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection , bronchitis
Uncommon (% to 1%): Cough, dyspnea, snoring, dysphonia
Rare (less than %): Pulmonary microembolism (POME) (cough, dyspnea, malaise, hyperhidrosis, chest pain, dizziness, paresthesia, or syncope) caused by oily solutions
Frequency not reported: Sleep apnea
Postmarketing reports: Chest pain, asthma , chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , hyperventilation, obstructive airway disorder, pharyngeal edema, pharyngolaryngeal pain, pulmonary embolism , respiratory distress, rhinitis , sleep apnea syndrome [ Ref ]

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