Side effects of steroid use in athletes

How often cortisone injections are given varies based on the reason for the injection. This is determined on a case-by-case basis by the health care practitioner. If a single cortisone injection is curative, then further injections are unnecessary. Sometimes, a series of injections might be necessary; for example, cortisone injections for a trigger finger may be given every three weeks, to a maximum of three times in one affected finger. In other instances, such as knee osteoarthritis, a second cortisone injection may be given approximately three months after the first injection, but the injections are not generally continued on a regular basis.

Cortisone injections are extremely safe, but they do still have potential problems. If you are concerned about having a cortisone shot, talk with your doctor. While cortisone is a powerful treatment for many orthopedic conditions, there are usually other options that can also be tried. Many doctors will offer an injection as they are quick, easy, and most often effective. However, your doctor should also be able to offer other treatments for inflammation that may also be effective for those that cannot have, or don't want, a cortisone injection.

Corticosteroid myopathy presents as weakness and wasting of the proximal limb and girdle muscles and is generally reversible following cessation of therapy.

Corticosteroids inhibit intestinal calcium absorption and increase urinary calcium excretion leading to bone resorption and bone loss. Bone loss of 3% over one year has been demonstrated with prednisolone 10 mg per day. Postmenopausal females are particularly at risk for loss of bone density. Sixteen percent of elderly patients treated with corticosteroids for 5 years may experience vertebral compression fractures. One author reported measurable bone loss over two years in women on concomitant therapy with prednisolone mg per day and tamoxifen . [ Ref ]

Common (1% to 10%): Sinusitis, nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection , bronchitis
Uncommon (% to 1%): Cough, dyspnea, snoring, dysphonia
Rare (less than %): Pulmonary microembolism (POME) (cough, dyspnea, malaise, hyperhidrosis, chest pain, dizziness, paresthesia, or syncope) caused by oily solutions
Frequency not reported: Sleep apnea
Postmarketing reports: Chest pain, asthma , chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , hyperventilation, obstructive airway disorder, pharyngeal edema, pharyngolaryngeal pain, pulmonary embolism , respiratory distress, rhinitis , sleep apnea syndrome [ Ref ]

Side effects of steroid use in athletes

side effects of steroid use in athletes

Common (1% to 10%): Sinusitis, nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection , bronchitis
Uncommon (% to 1%): Cough, dyspnea, snoring, dysphonia
Rare (less than %): Pulmonary microembolism (POME) (cough, dyspnea, malaise, hyperhidrosis, chest pain, dizziness, paresthesia, or syncope) caused by oily solutions
Frequency not reported: Sleep apnea
Postmarketing reports: Chest pain, asthma , chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , hyperventilation, obstructive airway disorder, pharyngeal edema, pharyngolaryngeal pain, pulmonary embolism , respiratory distress, rhinitis , sleep apnea syndrome [ Ref ]

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