Inhaled corticosteroids adverse effects

Oral and injectable systemic corticosterois are steroid hormones prescribed to decrease inflammation in diseases and conditions such as arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, for example), ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, asthma, bronchitis, some skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions that involve the nose and eyes. Examples of systemic corticosteroids include hydrocortisone (Cortef), cortisone, prednisone (Prednisone Intensol), prednisolone (Orapred, Prelone), and methylprednisolone (Medrol, Depo-Medrol, Solu-Medrol). Some of the side effects of systemic corticosteroids are swelling of the legs, hypertension, headache, easy bruising, facial hair growth, diabetes, cataracts, and puffiness of the face.

30 mg/kg/dose (Max: 1 gram/dose) IV or IM once daily for 1 to 3 days. High-dose pulse steroids may be considered as an alternative to a second infusion of IVIG or for retreatment of patients who have had recurrent or recrudescent fever after additional IVIG, but should not be used as routine primary therapy with IVIG in patients with Kawasaki disease. Corticosteroid treatment has been shown to shorten the duration of fever in patients with IVIG-refractory Kawasaki disease or patients at high risk for IVIG-refractory disease. A reduction in the frequency and severity of coronary artery lesions has also been reported with pulse dose methylprednisolone treatment.

How often cortisone injections are given varies based on the reason for the injection. This is determined on a case-by-case basis by the health care practitioner. If a single cortisone injection is curative, then further injections are unnecessary. Sometimes, a series of injections might be necessary; for example, cortisone injections for a trigger finger may be given every three weeks, to a maximum of three times in one affected finger. In other instances, such as knee osteoarthritis, a second cortisone injection may be given approximately three months after the first injection, but the injections are not generally continued on a regular basis.

While the use of inhaled LABAs are still recommended in asthma guidelines for the resulting improved symptom control, [22] further concerns have been raised, by a large meta-analysis of the pooled results from 19 trials with 33,826 participants, that salmeterol may increase the small risks of asthma deaths, and this additional risk is not reduced with the additional use of inhaled steroids (., as with the combination product fluticasone/salmeterol ). [23] This seems to occur because although LABAs relieve asthma symptoms, they also promote bronchial inflammation and sensitivity without warning. [24]

The most commonly reported side effects were: oral thrush , nausea , headache , and pain in the pharynx or larynx . More rarely reported side effects (occurring in <1% of patients during the clinical trial) include: tachycardia , palpitations , dry mouth , allergic reaction ( bronchospasm , dermatitis , hives ), pharyngitis , muscle spasms , tremor , dizziness , insomnia , nervousness , and hypertension . Patients experiencing an allergic reaction or increase in difficulty breathing while using this medication should immediately discontinue its use and contact their physician. [4]

Zab Mosenifar, MD, FACP, FCCP  Geri and Richard Brawerman Chair in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Professor and Executive Vice Chairman, Department of Medicine, Medical Director, Women's Guild Lung Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine

Zab Mosenifar, MD, FACP, FCCP is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Chest Physicians , American College of Physicians , American Federation for Medical Research , American Thoracic Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Inhaled corticosteroids adverse effects

inhaled corticosteroids adverse effects

While the use of inhaled LABAs are still recommended in asthma guidelines for the resulting improved symptom control, [22] further concerns have been raised, by a large meta-analysis of the pooled results from 19 trials with 33,826 participants, that salmeterol may increase the small risks of asthma deaths, and this additional risk is not reduced with the additional use of inhaled steroids (., as with the combination product fluticasone/salmeterol ). [23] This seems to occur because although LABAs relieve asthma symptoms, they also promote bronchial inflammation and sensitivity without warning. [24]

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